icon_rssicon_facebookicon_twitterandroid

Do you like it? Share it!

Vote!

Share on Google+1:

Creative commons

Creative Commons:

cc
Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives. More on CC website.

This licence is applied when nothing different is specified.

Note: texts are taken from various translations on the web, with an explicit indication of free sharing license and no copyright. If you want to report some violation, please send an email to staff@itellyouastory.com with your request and, if reasons are encountered, the text indicated will be immediately removed. Thank you for your cooperation.


Advertising

online viagra

Audio

audio-fiabe

Multimedia offers new perspective, sensation and emotion opportunities.

Your voice is the power of creativity and fantasy and the story become actually ... your story!

Send your video story to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

lalis-memory copyThe villagers of Kugaon village in North India were divided over cast. There were a large segment of upper cast and a smaller section of lower caste living on the opposites sides of the village, having their own independent farms, wells, schools, etc. However, there was a common hill not too far from the village which was a gateway to another state.

An eight year old girl called Sita belonging to another village came to live with her uncle for a few years, because her father had gone to the city in search of better financial prospects.

Her uncle was one of the members of the village panchayat and by default belonging to upper caste. She loved exploring the countryside. She was strictly warned from venturing into the other side by her uncle.

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio story.

Read more...

snow-white-rose-redThere was once a poor widow who lived in a lonely cottage. In front of the cottage was a garden wherein stood two rose-trees, one of which bore white and the other red roses. She had two children who were like the two rose-trees, and one was called Snow-white, and the other Rose- red.

They were as good and happy, as busy and cheerful as ever two children in the world were, only Snow-white was more quiet and gentle than Rose-red. Rose-red liked better to run about in the meadows and fields seeking flowers and catching butterflies; but Snow-white sat at home with her mother, and helped her with her housework, or read to her when there was nothing to do.

The two children were so fond of one another that they always held each other by the hand when they went out together, and when Snow- white said: "We will not leave each other," Rose-red answered: "Never so long as we live," and their mother would add: "What one has she must share with the other."

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

yellow-dwarf-audioOnce upon a time there lived a queen who had been the mother of a great many children, and of them all only one daughter was left. But then she was worth at least a thousand.

Her mother, who, since the death of the King, her father, had nothing in the world she cared for so much as this little Princess, was so terribly afraid of losing her that she quite spoiled her, and never tried to correct any of her faults. The consequence was that this little person, who was as pretty as possible, and was one day to wear a crown, grew up so proud and so much in love with her own beauty that she despised everyone else in the world.

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

white-catThere was once a king who had three sons, all remarkably handsome in their persons, and in their tempers brave and noble.

Some wicked courtiers made the king believe that the princes were impatient to wear the crown, and that they were contriving a plot to deprive him of his sceptre and his kingdom.

The king felt he was growing old; but as he found himself as capable of governing as he had ever been, he had no inclination to resign his power; and therefore, that he might pass the rest of his days peaceably, he determined to employ the princes in such a manner, as at once to give each of them the hope of succeeding to the crown, and fill up the time they might otherwise spend in so undutiful a manner.

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

clever-gretelThere was a cook whose name was Gretel. She wore shoes with red heels, and whenever she went out wearing them she would turn this way and that way, and she was very cheerful, thinking, "You are a beautiful girl!"

Then after returning home, because she was so happy, she would drink a swallow of wine, and the wine would give her an appetite, so she would taste the best of what she had cooked, until she was quite full, and then she would say, "The cook has to know how the food tastes."

One day her master said to her, "Gretel, this evening a guest is coming. Prepare two chickens for me, the best way that you can."

 Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

how-camel-hump-audioThe Just So Stories for Little Children were written by British author Rudyard Kipling. They are highly fantasised origin stories and are among Kipling's best known works.
The stories, first published in 1902, are pourquoi stories, fantastic accounts of how various phenomena came about.

A forerunner of these stories is "How Fear Came" in The Second Jungle Book (1895), in which Mowgli hears the story of how the tiger got his stripes.

The Just So Stories have a typical theme of a particular animal being modified from an original form to its current form by the acts of man, or some magical being. For example, the Whale has a tiny throat from a swallowed mariner who tied a raft in there to block the whale from swallowing others.

The Camel has a hump given to him by a djinn as punishment for the camel refusing to work (the hump allows the camel to work longer between eating).

The original editions of Just So Stories were illustrated by Kipling.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

story-three-bears-audio"The Story of the Three Bears" (sometimes known as "The Three Bears", "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" or, simply, "Goldilocks") is a fairy talefirst recorded in narrative form by British author and poet Robert Southey, and first published anonymously in a volume of his writings in 1837. The same year, British writer George Nicol published a version in rhyme based upon Southey's prose tale, with Southey approving the attempt to bring the story more exposure. Both versions tell of three bears and an old woman who trespasses upon their property.

"The Story of the Three Bears" was in circulation before the publication of Southey's 1837 version. In 1831, for example, Eleanor Mure fashioned a handmade booklet about the three bears for her nephew's birthday, and, in 1813, Southey was telling the story to friends. In 1894, "Scrapefoot", a tale with a fox as antagonist which bears striking similarities to Southey's story, was uncovered by the folklorist Joseph Jacobs and may predate Southey's version in the oral tradition. Southey possibly heard "Scrapefoot", and confused its "vixen" with a synonym for a crafty old woman. Some maintain however that the old woman was Southey's invention.

"The Story of the Three Bears" experienced two significant changes during its early publication history. Southey's intrusive old woman became an intrusive little girl in 1849, who was given various names referring to her hair until Goldilocks was settled upon in the early 20th century. Southey's three bachelor bears evolved into Father, Mother, and Baby Bear over the course of several years. What was originally a fearsome oral tale became a cozy family story with only a hint of menace. The story has elicited various interpretations and has been adapted to film, opera, and other media. "The Story of the Three Bears" is one of the most popular fairy tales in the English language.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

story-three-little-pigsThree Little Pigs is a fairy tale featuring anthropomorphic animals. Printed versions date back to the 1840s, but the story itself is thought to be much older.

The phrases used in the story, and the various morals which can be drawn from it, have become enshrined in western culture.

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in."
"No, no, not by the hair on my chinny chin chin."
"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house down."

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

travelling-musician-audioThe Town Musicians of Bremen (German: Die Bremer Stadtmusikanten) is a folktale recorded by the Brothers Grimm. Despite the title of the fairy tale, the characters never actually arrive in Bremen. In Aarne-Thompson classification it is a folk tale of type 130: "outcast animals find a new home".

The tale has been retold through animated pictures, motion pictures (often musicals) and theatre plays. Jim Henson produced a version with his Muppets called The Muppet Musicians of Bremen. In the Soviet Union, the story was loosely adapted into an animated musical in 1969 by Yuri Entin and Vasily Livanov at the studio Soyuzmultfilm, Town Musicians of Bremen. It was followed by a sequel called On the Trail of the Town Musicians of Bremen. In 2000, a second 56-minute sequel was made, called The New Bremen Musicians.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

emperor-new-clothes"The Emperor's New Clothes" (Danish: Kejserens nye Klæder) is a short tale by Hans Christian Andersen about two weavers who promise an Emperor a new suit of clothes that is invisible to those unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent.

When the Emperor parades before his subjects in his new clothes, a child cries out, "But he isn't wearing anything at all!"

The tale has been translated into over a hundred languages.

"The Emperor’s New Clothes" was first published with "The Little Mermaid" in Copenhagen by C. A. Reitzel on 7 April 1837 as the third and final installment of Andersen's Fairy Tales Told for Children. The tale has been adapted to various media, including the musical stage and animated film.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book!

Read more...

rapunzel-audio"Rapunzel" (English: /r?'p?nz?l/; German pronunciation: [?a'p?nt?s?l]) is a German fairy tale in the collection assembled by the Brothers Grimm, and first published in 1812 as part of Children's and Household Tales.

The Grimm Brothers' story is an adaptation of the fairy tale Persinette by Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force originally published in 1698.[2] Its plot has been used and parodied in various media and its best known line ("Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair") is an idiom of popular culture.In the Aarne–Thompson classification system for folktales it is type 310, "The Maiden in The Tower".[3]Andrew Lang included it in The Red Fairy Book.

Other versions of the tale also appear in A Book of Witches by Ruth Manning-Sanders and in Paul O. Zelinsky's 1998 Caldecott Medal-winning picture book, Rapunzel and the Disney movie Tangled.Rapunzel's story has striking similarities to the 10th century AD Persian tale of Rudaba, included in the epic poem Shahnameh by Ferdowsi. Rudaba offers to let down her hair from her tower so that her lover Zal can climb up to her. Some elements of the fairy tale might also have originally been based upon the tale of Saint Barbara, who was said to have been locked in a tower by her father.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the story!

Read more...

aladdin-audioAladdin (Arabic: علاء الدين‎, ʻAlāʼ ad-Dīn, IPA: [ʕalaːʔ adˈdiːn]; meaning, "glory of religion") is a Middle Eastern folk tale.

It is one of the tales in The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Arabian Nights), and one of the most famous, although it was actually added to the collection by Antoine Galland (see sources and setting).

Although Aladdin is a Middle Eastern tale, the story is set in China, and Aladdin is explicitly Chinese. However, the "China" of the story is an Islamic country, where most people are Muslims; there is a Jewish merchant who buys Aladdin's wares (and incidentally cheats him), but there is no mention of Buddhists or Confucians.

Everybody in this country bears an Arabic name, and its monarch seems much more like a Muslim ruler than a Chinese emperor. Some commentators believe that this suggests that the story might be set in Turkestan (encompassing Central Asia and the modern Chinese province of Xinjiang). It has to be said that this speculation depends on a knowledge of China that the teller of a folk tale (as opposed to a geographic expert) might well not possess, and that a deliberately exotic setting is in any case a common storytelling device.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the story!

Read more...

thumblingIn the first story, Thumbling, a poor childless peasant couple wishes for a child "no matter how small" aloud. Seven months later the wife has a small child "no longer than a thumb" which they call "Thumbling" and who becomes a "wise and nimble creature." Thumbling as he grows wishes to help his father in the chores so one day asks if he can lead their horse to where his father is working by sitting in the horse's ear and giving it directions. As Thumbling performs this chore, two strange men notice the horse being led by a loud voice, and when they find out the voice belongs to a person sitting in the horse's ear, ask the peasant if they can buy Thumbling to "make a fortune" in exhibiting the little man. Thumbling convinces the peasant to take the money and leaves with the men by sitting on the brim of one of the men's hats. Then after a while Thumbling tricks the men into letting him down and he goes to hide in a mouse hole.

Later in the night Thumbling tries to sleep in a snail shell but is awakened by the sound of robbers plotting to rob a pastor's house. Thumbling yells out to them to take him along and he will help them rob it, by going into the house and handing things out to them. The robbers agree to carry him to the pastor and Thumbling makes a whole lot of noise in the house pretending to help the robbers steal. Thumbling wakes people up by yelling things like "What do you want? Do you want everything...?" making the robbery very obvious. A maid wakes up and scares off the robbers but does not see Thumbling. Thumbling gets a good night sleep in the hay. However in the morning the maid feeds the hay that he was sleeping in to the cow. Thumbling begins to yell from the cow's stomach but the pastor thinks that an "evil spirit" had entered the cow, and has it killed. The cow's stomach is thrown into a dung heap, and before Thumbling climbs all the way out of the stomach, a wolf eats it. Thumbling, now inside of the wolf's stomach, persuades the wolf to take him home to his parents' on pretense of eating everything there. His parents kill the wolf to get Thumbling out and promise never to sell him again, not for "all the riches in the world." They give him food, drink and new clothes.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the story.

Read more...

jack-beanstalkJack and the Beanstalk is an English folktale. The tale is closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant-killer, and is known under a number of versions.

Benjamin Tabart's moralized version of 1807 is the first appearance in print, but "Felix Summerly" (Henry Cole) popularized it in The Home Treasury (1842), and Joseph Jacobs rewrote it in English Fairy Tales (1890).

Jacobs's version is most commonly reprinted today and is believed to more closely adhere to the oral versions than Tabart's, because it lacks the moralizing of that version.The origin of Jack and the Beanstalk is unclear. However, Sir Francis Palgrave once wrote that it was most likely that the tale arrived with the Viking boats.

The earliest printed edition which has survived is the 1807 book The History of Jack and the Bean Stalk, printed by Benjamin Tabart, although the story was already in existence sometime before this, as a burlesque of the story entitled The Story of Jack Spriggins and the Enchanted Bean was included in the 1734 second edition of Round About Our Coal-Fire.In the classic version of the tale, the giant is unnamed, but many plays based on the story name him as Blunderbore; a giant of that name also appears in Jack the Giant Killer.

The giant's "Fee! Fie! Foe! Fum!" was included in William Shakespeare's King Lear.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the story!

Read more...

TOOTH FAIRY MAGIC

Audiobook

Text

Hurricane Hilda’s tooth was getting wigglier and wigglier.  She had been crunching on raw carrots, munching on juicy apples and lunching on crusty bread for over a week, trying to make that tooth fall out!  Hurricane Hilda was looking forward to putting her tooth under her pillow in a special silver box and having her first visit from The Tooth Fairy…

Hurricane_HildaNow it was Hurricane Hilda’s first day at real school, and she was so busy learning her way around and making friends in Miss Scott’s class, that she almost forgot about her wobbly tooth.  Until snack time, that is, when she ate a spoonful of soft apricot yoghurt… and found something small and hard in it!  Hurricane Hilda’s tooth was out at last and she hurried to tell her teacher the exciting news.

Miss Scott wrapped the tooth in a piece of white tissue paper and said she would keep it safe on her desk until it was time for Hurricane Hilda to take it home.  But when the home bell rang, Miss Scott could not find the tissue paper or the tooth anywhere.  Hurricane Hilda helped look all over Miss Scott’s desk, in the drawers, and even in the wastepaper bin, but there was no sign of Hurricane Hilda’s tooth.  Miss Scott said she was very sorry.  On the way home, Hurricane Hilda explained to Mummy that her tooth had fallen out and gone missing somewhere in the classroom.

That night Hurricane Hilda was very sad that she had no tooth to put in the silver box for The Tooth Fairy to collect from under her pillow and exchange for some coins.  Mummy told Hurricane Hilda not to worry, as they would take extra good care of the next tooth that fell out.  So Hurricane Hilda snuggled down to sleep and dreamed of The Tooth Fairy.

Read more...

puss-boots-audio"Master Cat; or, The Booted Cat" (early French: Le Maître Chat, ou Le Chat Botté), commonly known as "Puss in Boots", is a French literary fairy tale about a cat who uses trickery and deceit to gain power, wealth, and the hand of a princess in marriage for his penniless and low-born master.

The tale was written at the close of the seventeenth century by Charles Perrault (1628–1703), a retired civil servant and member of the Académie française.

The tale appeared in a handwritten and illustrated manuscript two years before its 1697 publication by Barbin in a collection of eight fairy tales by Perrault called Histoires ou contes du temps passé. The book was an instant success and remains popular.

Perrault's Histoires has had considerable impact on world culture. The original french title was "Histoires ou contes du temps passé or Les Contes de ma Mère l'Oye (Stories or Fairy Tales from Past Times with Morals or "Mother Goose Tales"... "The frontispiece to the earliest English editions depicts an old woman telling tales to a group of children beneath a placard inscribed "MOTHER GOOSE'S TALES" and is credited with launching the Mother Goose legend in the English-speaking world.

"Puss in Boots" has provided inspiration for composers, choreographers, and other artists over the centuries. The cat appears in the third act pas de caractère of Tchaikovsky's ballet The Sleeping Beauty, for example, and makes appearances in other media.

Read more...

HURRICANE HILDA AND THE AVALANCHE CUPBOARD

Audiobook

Text

Hurricane Hilda had a fantastic bedroom.  She had toys, books, puzzles, games, dressing up costumes, and exciting posters on the walls.  When Hurricane Hilda was very little, her mother would tidy the bedroom each evening, so that Hurricane Hilda would wake up surrounded by all her things in their proper places.

hurricane-hilda-strikes-againOne snowy winter’s day, Mummy explained to Hurricane Hilda that she was now big enough to learn to tidy her own things away each day.  Mummy spent a whole week showing Hurricane Hilda how to collect her toys together, and where to put everything.

The following week Hurricane Hilda was trusted with the job of tidying up her toys by herself.  But instead of putting things carefully where they belonged, Hurricane Hilda thought she would save time and effort by piling her things on top of each other in one big cupboard.

Each evening when Mummy checked Hurricane Hilda’s bedroom, she was pleased to see the room looking tidy.  Mummy thought that Hurricane Hilda was being very good at putting her things away properly.  But Mummy did not know that toys were piling higher and higher inside the cupboard.  By the end of the week the pile was in danger of crashing to the ground!

Then something terrible happened!  Mummy was looking for a bedtime story book to read to Hurricane Hilda, and she opened the cupboard where all the toys were piled up.  Everything tumbled out of the cupboard like an avalanche!  There was an enormous “CRASH!” as all of Hurricane Hilda’s favourite toys and books were broken and torn when they landed on the floor.

Read more...

hansel-and-gretel"Hansel and Gretel" (German: Hänsel und Gretel, diminutives of Johannes and Margaret) is a well-known fairy tale of German origin, recorded by the Brothers Grimm and published in 1812.

Hansel and Gretel are a young brother and sister threatened by a cannibalistic hag living deep in the forest in a house constructed of cake and confectionery. The two children save their lives by outwitting her.

The tale has been adapted to various media, most notably the opera Hänsel und Gretel (1893) by Engelbert Humperdinck and a stop-motion animated feature film made in the 1950s based on the opera. 

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio book.

Read more...

Mr Crabby Crab's Great Adventure

 
Audio-book

Text

It was a very sunny day in Rainbow Town and Hurricane Hilda was at the beach with all her friends.  When all of the sudden, out of the water came Mr Crabby Crab with his two big eyes and pincers... Snip! Snip!  Snap! Snap!

hurricane-hilda-meets-mr-crabby-crab

He climbed over Hurricane Hilda (tickle, tickle) and he swiped Mandy's pink sunglasses.  And he put them on his two big eyes.  Snip! Snip!

Then he climbed over Andy (tickle, tickle) and he swiped Sandy's ice-cream cone.  And he ate it!  Snap! Snap!

Next Mr Crabby Crab pinched Policeman Dandy's big toe!  Snip! Snap!  "Aaaaagh!" cried Policeman Dandy as he kicked his foot, sending Mr Crabby Crab flying through the air...

Read more...

beauty-beastBeauty and the Beast (French: La Belle et la Bête) is a traditional fairy tale.

The first published version of the fairy tale was a rendition by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, published in La jeune américaine, et les contes marins in 1740.

The best-known written version was an abridgement of her work published in 1756 by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, in Magasin des enfants, ou dialogues entre une sage gouvernante et plusieurs de ses élèves; an English translation appeared in 1757.

Variants of the tale are known across Europe. In France, for example, Zémire et Azor is an operatic version of the story of Beauty and the Beast written by Marmontel and composed by Grétry in 1771. It had enormous success well into the 19th century. It is based on the second version of the tale.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the audio-book!

Read more...

jack-giant-killer"Jack the Giant Killer" is a Cornish fairy tale about a plucky lad who slays a number of giants during King Arthur's reign. The tale is characterized by violence, gore, and blood-letting. Giants are prominent in Cornish folklore and Welsh Bardic lore. Some parallels to elements and incidents in Norse mythology have been detected in the tale, and the trappings of Jack's last adventure with the giant Galigantus suggest parallels with French fairy tales. Jack's belt is similar to the belt in "The Valiant Little Tailor", and his magical sword, shoes, cap, and cloak are similar to those owned by Tom Thumb or those found in Norse mythology.

Neither Jack or his tale are referenced in English literature prior to the eighteenth century, and his story did not appear in print until 1711. It is probable an enterprising publisher assembled a number of anecdotes about giants to form the 1711 tale. One scholar speculates the public had grown weary of King Arthur – the greatest of all giant killers – and Jack was created to fill his shoes. Henry Fielding, John Newbery, Dr. Johnson, Boswell, and William Cowper were familiar with the tale.

In 1962, a feature-length film based on the tale was released starring Kerwin Mathews. The film made extensive use of stop-motion animation in the manner of Ray Harryhausen.

(Wikipedia)

Click on "Read more" to listen the fairy tale!

Read more...